Signs Of Use And Dependence

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  • NARCOTIC PAINKILLERS

    Opioids are narcotic, painkilling drugs produced naturally from opium or made synthetically. This class of drugs includes heroin, morphine, codeine, methadone and oxycodone (OxyContin). If you’re prescribed these medications by a doctor, take them exactly as directed. Don’t increase your dose without first talking to your doctor.

    SIGNS OF NARCOTIC USE & DEPENDENCE CAN INCLUDE:

    Reduced sense of pain
    Sedation
    Depression
    Confusion
    Constipation
    Slowed breathing
    Needle marks (if injecting drugs)

  • METHAMPHETAMINE, COCAINE, AND OTHER STIMULANTS

    This class of drugs includes amphetamines, methamphetamine, cocaine and methylphenidate (Ritalin).

    SIGNS OF USE & DEPENDENCE:

    • A heightened sense of visual, auditory and taste perception
    • Poor memory
    • Increased blood pressure and heart rate
    • Red eyes
    • Decreased coordination
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Increased appetite
    • Slowed reaction time
    • Paranoid thinking
  • MARIJUANA & HASISH

    It’s possible to develop a psychological addiction to cannabis compounds including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) found in marijuana and hashish. People who have a marijuana addiction generally use the drug on a daily basis. They don’t actually have a chemical dependence on the drug but rather feel the need to regularly use the drug.

    SIGNS OF USE & DEPENDENCE:

    • A heightened sense of visual, auditory and taste perception
    • Poor memory
    • Increased blood pressure and heart rate
    • Red eyes
    • Decreased coordination
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Increased appetite
    • Slowed reaction time
    • Paranoid thinking
  • ALCOHOL

    Alcoholism is a chronic and often progressive disease that includes problems controlling your drinking, being preoccupied with alcohol, continuing to use alcohol even when it causes problems, having to drink more to get the same effect (physical dependence), or having withdrawal symptoms when you rapidly decrease or stop drinking. If you have alcoholism, you can’t consistently predict how much you’ll drink, how long you’ll drink, or what consequences will occur from your drinking.

    It’s possible to have a problem with alcohol, even when it has not progressed to the point of alcoholism. Problem drinking means you drink too much at times, causing repeated problems in your life, although you’re not completely dependent on alcohol.

    Binge drinking — a pattern of drinking where a male consumes five or more drinks in a row, or a female downs at least four drinks in a row — can lead to the same health risks and social problems associated with alcoholism. The more you drink, the greater the risks. Binge drinking, which often occurs with teenagers and young adults, may lead to faster development of alcoholism.

    If you have alcoholism or you have a problem with alcohol, you may not be able to cut back or quit without help. Denying that you have a problem is usually part of alcoholism and other types of excessive drinking.
    If you think you or a loved one may have a drinking problem, seek help immediately. Go to an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, seek advice from a medical professional, find an alcohol program or alcohol addiction treatment or call NYCATS at 212-966-9537.

  • CLUB DRUGS

    Club drugs are drugs commonly used by teens and young adults at clubs, concerts and parties. Examples include Ecstasy (MDMA), GHB, Rohypnol (“roofies”) and ketamine. These drugs are not all classified in the same category, but they share some similar effects and dangers.

    SIGNS OF CLUB DRUG USE & DEPENDENCE CAN INCLUDE:

    An exaggerated feeling of great happiness or well-being (euphoria)
    Reduced inhibitions
    A heightened or altered sense of sight, sound and taste
    Amphetamine-like effects (with ketamine and Ecstasy)
    Decreased coordination
    Poor judgment
    Memory problems or loss of memory
    Increased or decreased heart rate and blood pressure
    Drowsiness and loss of consciousness (with GHB and Rohypnol)

  • BARBITURATES & BENZODIAZEPINES

    Barbiturates and benzodiazepines are prescription central nervous system depressants. Phenobarbital, amobarbital (Amytal) and secobarbital (Seconal) are examples of barbiturates. Benzodiazepines include tranquilizers, such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan), clonazepam (Klonopin) and chlordiazepoxide (Librium). If you’re prescribed these drugs, take them exactly as ordered. If you feel your need for these medications is increasing, talk to your doctor.

    SIGNS OF USE & DEPENDENCE:

    • A heightened sense of visual, auditory and taste perception
    • Poor memory
    • Increased blood pressure and heart rate
    • Red eyes
    • Decreased coordination
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Increased appetite
    • Slowed reaction time
    • Paranoid thinking
  • HALLUCINOGENS


    Use of hallucinogens produces different signs and symptoms depending on the drug. The most common hallucinogens are LSD and phencyclidine (PCP).

    SIGNS OF LSD USE INCLUDE:

    Hallucinations
    Greatly reduced perception of reality, for example, interpreting input from one of your senses as another, such as hearing colors
    Permanent mental changes in perception
    Rapid heart rate
    High blood pressure
    Tremors
    Flashbacks, a re-experience of the hallucinations — even years later

  • INHALANTS

    The signs and symptoms of inhalant use vary depending on what substance is inhaled. Some commonly inhaled substances include glue, paint thinners, correction fluid, felt tip marker fluid, gasoline, cleaning fluids and household aerosol products.

    When inhaled, these products can cause brief intoxication and a decreased feeling of inhibition. Long-term use may cause seizures and damage to the brain, liver and kidneys. Inhalant use can also cause death.

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